hereffil53.cf

How to fit a blazer – a comprehensive guide on how to select the right blazer for you!

The blazer is an iconic piece of menswear, and precisely for this very reason I decided it was time for an extensive guide about this garment.

At the shortest point, a sweater should hit past the bottom of your belt buckle. Thanks for the personalized tips.

Blazers are the quintessential closet staple. In this article we go over different blazer styles and provide quick tips on how to fit a blazer and getting the best fit.
Discover Men's Blazers size guide with ASOS. Please note that size charts relate to ASOS own brand clothing and are designed to fit to the following body measurements. Some brands may vary from these measurements but you can still use them as a guide.
Discover Men's Blazers size guide with ASOS. Please note that size charts relate to ASOS own brand clothing and are designed to fit to the following body measurements. Some brands may vary from these measurements but you can still use them as a guide.
MEN'S BLAZER SIZING GUIDE. How to Measure for Men’s Blazers: • Chest - With arms relaxed at sides, measure directly under your arms around the fullest part of your chest. Blazer sizes should correspond to your chest size (i.e., if you are a man with a 38
A suit with these “bad fit” signs is one that you probably won’t ever be able to adjust to a really good fit. Unfortunately, most of them are caused by the core structure of the suit — and that means that your body just isn’t a good match for the way that particular brand makes its pieces.

MEN'S BLAZER SIZING GUIDE. How to Measure for Men’s Blazers: • Chest - With arms relaxed at sides, measure directly under your arms around the fullest part of your chest. Blazer sizes should correspond to your chest size (i.e., if you are a man with a 38

Do you have a Theory outlet near you? My other favorite place to find Theory blazers is Bloomingdales. They usually have a better selection than Nordstrom, and their sales can be really good.

Thank you so much for sharing the tips! Thank you for the super informative post. I am often undiscriminating when it comes to blazers that fit just ok…so will have to reference this post a lot in the future.

Yeah, if you have broad shoulders already, too much padding can look awful! Have you tried draped blazers? You talk about the sleeves being narrow and short enough…I need a jacket with sleeves wide and long enough! Is that fixable at a tailor? I just want something that will be comfortable and look good! Kelly, I like this post. The blazer has already been taken in and had the sleeves slimmed.

Can the armholes be made smaller? Maybe someone else will have a better answer for you. This will run you a hefty amount. Kelly, this post is super informative. Finding a blazer that fits is probably a bit easier for me than for you since I am bigger.

I will definitely keep this post in mind the next time I shop for a blazer. Wonderful post — I especially enjoyed learning about shoulder fit trick. I am definitely going to try that for all future blazer purchases. LOL on the Incredible Hulk line. That had honestly never occurred to me but it makes sense! I have never thought of these points when I trying on blazer before. I will have to remember this or bookmark this post on my cell phone. Thanks for the detailed and clear breakdown.

This is such a great post! It was imformative and I especially liked the tip about leaning against the wall since I normally just eyeball it and end up not making the purchase since I am left unsure. Now I can verify for sure!

Thanks for the post Kelly. How difficult is it to have too-wide shoulders altered to fit smaller? Is this something a good tailor can do and how much does it usually cost? I just had it done for the first time, and it can be tricky and expensive. As you can see, it can be a pretty involved process. Price can be high as far as alterations go, but if you love your coat enough to put a little bit of money in it to look really sharp, it may be a very wise investment.

Thank you for your tips and input. Well fitting blazers definitely take up an outfit multiple notches! Thanks for the tips. What would you say the proper mobility of the blazer arms? I have a blazer that is fitted, but I think the arms mobility are somewhat restricted when I reach up or extend the arms. Do you have any thoughts on this? I think some mobility restriction is normal, but you should still be able to reach upward with full extension, the blazer will just move up a little with your arms.

This a great post, Kelly, thanks! This is such an informative post! However, my torso is extremely slim so most blazers look boxy on me.

You should see no divots or wrinkles in the shoulders anywhere. The shoulders should lay perfectly flat, with no divots or rumpling or pulling on the shoulders. This is a very easy and common fix for a tailor to do. The collar should rest against your shirt collar, which in turn should rest against the back of your neck. All of these should touch lightly, without significant gaps in between. The picture below shows where the armholes should be on your blazer. My rule of thumb is no more than about an inch above and never, ever below.

You should see no divots or wrinkles in the shoulders, as well. With your arms straight down, bend your wrist, so your palms are facing the ground, the sleeves should lightly touch the top of your hand.

Where the white shirt cuff is hitting is where your coat sleeves should be hitting. Just enough to cover it, basically. When buttoned, the coat should not be roomy, but should lie close to your body. That being said, it should be in no way taut or feel constricting on your chest or midsection when wearing it over a suit or blazer.

This picture below of the same coat my model is wearing, by Brooks Brothers perfectly illustrates how it should fit in the body. A good rule of thumb is mid-thigh to just above your knee is where your Overcoat should hit.

Just like with Overcoats, you want the shoulder seams of a Peacoat to end where your shoulders naturally end — where they start curving down to your arm, basically. If you have more rounded shoulders, the seam should still end in the same place. If the shoulders are too big or small, a tailor will have a very hard time fixing this, and it would be very expensive — if it was even possible.

So ensure these fit properly before buying your peacoat. Just like an Overcoat: Where the white shirt cuff is hitting is where your Peacoat sleeves should be hitting.

When buttoned, the jacket should lightly hug your midsection, but not feel tight or constricting. When wearing your Peacoat, leave the bottom two buttons unbuttoned. Buttoning a Peacoat all the way down is very odd looking and never done by anyone but a rookie. On my model, above, the Peacoat ends right around lower crotch. Balancing proportions is a mistake a lot of guys make and can really influence how big or small you look in clothing.

This is pretty straight-forward. Anything wider will be more bulky and is considered more casual. Even though the width is only slightly smaller than a casual belt, it makes a huge difference in appearance. Compare this picture of a guy wearing a wider belt as a dress belt compared to the image of my model.

Anything more than that is too wide and will look out of place. Slimmer than that looks more like a dress belt. Sleeves The sleeves should hit around mid-bicep and lightly hug your arms. Waist and Seat Like all your pants, they should fit perfectly around your waist with no need for a belt to hold them up.

Length The shirt should end somewhere between upper to mid crotch. This advice goes for any of these pants: A lot of my clients ask me how should a sweater fit, so I figured it was time to write down my typical answer so you can understand this, as well.

You can kind of see the seam sitting way too high on his shoulder on his bent arm side. For a blazer that best fits your body type, you should definitely pay attention to this. Typically, the higher the stance the more buttons you will find on a blazer. As an example, you might find three buttons on a blazer that has a high stance while a blazer with a low stance has one button.

Some key things to keep in mind is that if you have a larger bust, you might find a better fit with a two or three-button blazer. While it might not be an initial thought, the style and fit of the lapel is essential to the overall look of your blazer. The bigger the lapel the more bulk it will create on top, and the less lengthening your look will be.

Usually, the less petite you are, the more you can get away with wearing larger lapel sides. There is a myriad of lengths blazers are made in. The length of a traditional blazer is around your hipbone. They tend to be flattering for most body shapes. Whichever length you choose, be sure to keep the proportions of your overall look in mind to create the best silhouette for you. This is a topic that we discuss at length in our style course where we give you easy tips and examples to achieve a golden ratio with your overall outfit for your specific body type.

Traditional length blazers , as mentioned above, fall along the hipbone and are flattering for most shapes. Cropped length look best when paired with pants or skirts that have a higher waist. Alternatively, wearing them with longer tops also creates an elongating look. They also are the perfect partner to a well fitting dress. Extra long are often the boyfriend style blazers that are another effortless layering piece. When wearing a boyfriend style blazer, the key here for most body shape types is to balance the oversized look with a more fitted bottom.

As an example, wear an oversized blazer with slim fit jeans for a more balanced silhouette. Under no circumstances should your blazer feel so tight around your shoulders that you can hardly raise your arms or move around comfortably. While the look and feel should be fitted, you do not want too loose of a fit around the shoulders unless the style is intentionally cut that way, which is not universally flattering. The goal is to have the seams of the shoulder be as close to the end of your shoulders as possible.

If a jacket seam does not reach the end of your shoulder it may be too tight. If it goes over your shoulder you will will get the bunching effect on your upper arms which is very unflattering. We would also recommend that you do not turn your nose up at the idea of shoulder pads. They serve a very functional purpose of maintaining the shoulder shape and fit. The sleeves of your blazer are also important to take into account when purchasing or sizing a blazer. Ideally, the sleeves of your blazers should end at your wrist bone.

However, there is always the case of different lengths as discussed above , which could affect how and where your sleeve hits various points of your arm. One thing to keep in mind is that if you are going for a professional look, it is not beneficial to have sleeves that hit mid arm or do not quite reach your wrist bone. Other settings will allow almost any type of sleeve, as long as the look is flattering to your body shape.

T he short and honest answer for how should a Blazer fit is exactly how a Suit Jacket should fit, so if this article looks familiar, it’s because it’s pretty much the same advice. How long should a Blazer be? The length of your blazer will dictate how “balanced” your upper body is to your lower body. The blazer should end around mid to lower crotch. MEN'S BLAZER SIZING GUIDE. How to Measure for Men’s Blazers: • Chest - With arms relaxed at sides, measure directly under your arms around the fullest part of your chest. Blazer sizes should correspond to your chest size (i.e., if you are a man with a 38" chest, you should probably fit best in a size 38 blazer). Blazers are the quintessential closet staple. In this article we go over different blazer styles and provide quick tips on how to fit a blazer and getting the best fit.